The Overcast at The Exchange

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Leah Hamer || March 5th

Brine exert that youthful grunge spirit, forged in the fires of a Northern garage. Their singer’s eyes hide behind black, circular sunglasses, as his voice shifts from a fuzzy mumble to a throaty yell. When he’s not singing, his microphone is home to a stand-up-comedy routine- shared with the rest of his band mates, and their friends in the crowd. The members of Plastic stand below, jeering and throwing insults at them, in between clapping and hopping onto the stage to join them occasionally. Dizzy guitar rock with swaying melodies and angst-riddled drums, Brine brought the noise, and a crowd along with it.

Plastic paralyse you in seconds with the quick-fired, Drowned In You, a gruesome, death-defying display of heavy rock and roll. Deep, reckless vocals bellow over dirty drum beats and finger bleeding riffs. Like their touring partners, Plastic, also came with sunglasses- making their comradery with Brine immediately obvious. Bludgeoning rhythms, head banging beats and die-hard attitudes. It ended with the singer becoming possessed by some rock demon, rolling around on the floor, inconsolable to the music. Truly one for the Thursday night moshers.

‘We’re doing that thing where the band play and the singer comes on stage after…we’ve never done that before’, Sam Bloor laughs as The Overcast kick off their headline set. With a healthy crowd gathered, singer Jim Carter, cloaked in a hoody, makes his way through and declares his love for all of those out on a cold Thursday night, supporting local music. Their latest release, Misery Loves Company (and it's better under lock and key), blasts you with its punchy, catchy riff, deadly lyrics and corrosive drum beat. It reveals each of the essential components of The Overcast magnificently. Like mechanical cogs, each member is polished and precise, working in synchronicity. For a mid-week gig in most places, you could normally expect a dull crowd and low-calibre performance, but for The Overcast, ‘dull’ and ‘low-calibre’, are clearly alien concepts- entertainment and excitement are their specialties- any day of the week.